Tag Archives: colds and flu

Clove Bud (Eugenia caryophyllata)

Clove bud header

Family: Myrtaceae

Synonyms: Syzygium aromaticum, E. aromatica, Caryophyllus aromaticus.

Aroma: Spicy, warm, woody and pungent.

Colour: Colourless to pale yellow moving to darker brown

clove branchPlant: Pyramidal evergreen tree with a smooth grey trunk which grows up to 15 metres. The bright green leaves stand in pairs on short stalks. At the beginning of the wet season buds appear with a rosy pink corolla at the tip. As the corolla fades the calyx turns deep red and these are picked or beaten from the tree and dried in the sun for several days.

Main Growing Areas: Molucca islands, Brazil, the West Indies, Mauritius, Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Zanzibar, Pemba.

Major Constituents: Eugenol, eugenyl acetate, caryophyllene, isocaryophyllene

Interesting snippets: Quack comes from the clove filled leather beaks the European doctors wore and breathed through to ward off the plague.

The Greeks, Romans and Chinese traditionally used clove to sweeten the breath and ease toothache.

During the Renaissance, pomanders were made with cloves to keep epidemics and the plague at bay.

Dentists used to dab clove oil over a tooth before filling it to decrease sensitivity.

The first recorded use of cloves was in China in the Han Dynasty (220-206BC) where it was used as a breath sweetener.

Part of Plant used / Extraction: Steam distillation of the crushed unopened dried flower buds.

Therapeutic actions: Toothache, diarrhoea, flatulence, insect repellent, colds and flu, restore appetite, stimulate digestion, rheumatic aches and pains, sprains and strains.

Emotional and Spiritual: Depression, self-confidence, reawakens passion and instils a capacity for creative vision.

Robbi Zeck writes that when you hang on to things for longer than you need them congestion will occur. Accumulation affects you physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Clear out your clutter and create the space for different opportunities and experiences to enter your life. Find pleasure in the simple things in life.

Gabriel Mojay writes that clove essential oil is indicated in particular for those who feel isolated and unsupported. Riddled with feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt, such individuals identify their lack of interest in life with an insufficient degree of meaningful interaction and warmth. They find it difficult to extend themselves emotionally due to their poor self-image and their emotional detachment. Clove essential oil not only helps to restore emotional vitality but also comforts and allays the feeling of loneliness that itself can exacerbate one’s distance from others.

Valerie Ann Worwood states that clove has no time for contemplation only for action. Her message is to move forward, make things happen, achieve as much as your spirit can without harming another.

Deborah Eidson thinks that clove bud helps you reflect upon the root cause of pain, recognize how it once served you, and realize it is no longer needed. Clove also helps in examining and overcoming the root causes of fear and anger so you may experience greater joy and spontaneity.

Aromatherapy Insight Card:

 Aromatherapy Insight Card

REMOVES ATTACHMENTS

Clove assists in releasing attachments, empowering you to move forward, exploring new possibilities and experiences. Go with the ever-changing environment and do not allow yourself to get too attached to one style or system. Explore new possibilities, be a living example and inspiration to others.

To make effective change in the world, first change yourself and the rest will follow.

Fragrant Change Healing Cards: I clear the clutter from my life both internal and external.

Clove

Safety: Can cause skin irritation so keep below 0.5% dilution in blend. Don’t use with children under 2 years of age.

Note: Clove bud oil maybe adulterated with clove stem or leaf oil, or clove terpenes remaining after eugenol extraction.

Sources:
Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. The Perfect Potion, Australia (1995)
Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. Third Edition, Vol.1The Perfect Potion, Australia (2018)
Eidson D, Vibrational Healing, Frog Books (2000)
Fischer-Rizzi S, Complete Aromatherapy Handbook. Essential Oils for Radiant Health Sterling Publishing Company (1990)
Hodges C, Fragrant Change Healing Cards (2015)
Jefferies J, Clove Essential Oil Profile. Aromatherapy Today, Vol.34 (2005)
Jefferies J, Osborn K, Aromatherapy Insight Cards. Living Energy, Aust. (2nd Ed. 2005)
Mojay G, Clove class noes (1999)
Worwood V.A, The Fragrant Heavens. Doubleday Publishing UK (1999)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)

 

Black Pepper (Piper Nigrum)

black pepper header

Black Pepper is strength and fortitude, giving us the bravery to venture forth into places unknown and unseen. Valerie Ann Worwood

Family: Piperaceae

Aroma: Warm, spicy like aroma

Colour: Pale amber

black-pepper-vinePlant: A perennial woody vine up to 5 metres high with heart shaped leaves and small white flowers. The berries turn red to black as they mature.

Main Growing Areas: India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brazil, Sri Lanka.
Major Constituents: Beta-caryophyllene, delta-3-carene, limonene and alpha and beta pinene, sabinene.

Interesting snippets: Black pepper is one of the oldest known spices and in medieval Europe was worth its weight in gold.

In Roman times taxes were paid with black pepper instead of coins.

The Greeks used it to combat fever.

If the fruits ripen before drying they yield white pepper.

To give them the ability to cover large distances on foot, the mendicant monks of India, swallow 7-9 grains of pepper a day.

Part of Plant used / Extraction: Dried crushed black peppercorns by steam distillation.

Therapeutic actions: Muscular aches and pains, tired and aching limbs, warming oil for cold hands and feet, severe bruising, stimulates appetite, expels wind, constipation, onset of colds or flu with headaches, chills and fatigue. May help if you are trying to quit smoking.

Emotional and Spiritual:
Black pepper helps to strengthen your willpower and determination so that you are able to overcome obstacles, face challenges and persevere during difficult times.

Addresses the feelings of anxiety, worry, lack and despair that can make you feel powerless and stimulates the courage and determination to face your fears and overcome them, thus increasing your self-confidence and self-worth. Helps to digest any feelings of frustration and anger you may have about yourself.

Patricia Davis writes that black pepper helps us to get a move on at times when our lives feel stuck. It helps move blocks that can prevent movement between one chakra and another, especially between the solar plexus and heart.

Black pepper enables us to listen to the inner voice of inspiration, and to take chances knowing that, whatever happens, we alone have taken them writes Valerie Ann Worwood

Robbi Zeck notes that you are in charge of your life and to take responsibility for what you say, think, feel and do. Being accountable also means letting go of blame and judgement of yourself and others.

Aromatherapy Insight Card:Black Pepper Aromatherapy Insight CardDIRECTION
Helps you find your direction in life. You have no idea or some idea of where you want to head in life, but you are running out of the emotional stamina to keep going. The warmth of Black Pepper assists in loosening blockages that may be holding you back. You are trustworthy and loyal but feel responsible for everything and everyone, use Black Pepper to stay focused on your path. Allow your ability to motivate others to bring warmth and confidence to yourself. Follow your direction in life and prosper.

Fragrant Change Healing Card: I take responsibility for my life choices and decisions.Black Pepper FCHCContemplations for the Soul Card:Black Pepper CFTS cardAre you continually blaming others and fate for whatever goes wrong in your life?
Do you lean on or cling to others wanting them to make decisions for you?
Do you lack trust in your own judgement and continually worry about the decisions you have made?
It’s time to stop and stand on your own two feet. You have the inner strength to take responsibility for your actions and their consequences.
Decide now whether you want to stay stuck blaming everyone and everything but yourself for whatever happens in your life or to move on and take back your power.
Whenever a decision needs to be made and you are unsure which path to take, be still, listen to your inner guidance and act.
Whatever the outcome take responsibility for it knowing that you are taking charge of your life and the direction it takes.

Safety: Non-toxic can be an irritant on sensitive skin if the oil is old or oxidized.

Note: Black pepper is often adulterated with turpentine oil, a-phellandrene, limonene from orange terpenes and clove leaf terpenes so it is important that you know and trust your supplier.

Sources: Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. The Perfect Potion, Australia (1995)
Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. Third Edition, Vol.1The Perfect Potion, Australia (2018)
Bowles E.J, The A to Z of Essential Oils. New Burlington Books (2003)
Davis P, Subtle Aromatherapy. The C.W.Daniel Company Ltd. (1992)
Eidson D, Vibrational Aromatherapy. Revealing the essence of nature through aromatherapy’s use of essential oils. Frog Ltd, Berkley, California (2000)
Hodges C, Fragrant Change Healing Cards (2015)
Hodges C. Contemplations for the Soul (2016)
Jefferies J, Osborn K, Aromatherapy Insight Cards. Living Energy, Aust. (2nd Ed. 2005)
Kerr J, Black Pepper Essential Oil Profile. Aromatherapy Today, Vol.1 (1997)
Tisserand R and Young R, Essential Oil Safety Second Edition, Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, (2014)
Lawless J, Complete Essential Oils. Element Books (1995)
Worwood V.A, The Fragrant Heavens. Doubleday Publishing UK (1999)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)

 

Pine (Pinus sylvestris)

Pine header

To me a lush carpet of pine needles or spongy grass is more welcome than the most luxurious Persian rug.
Helen Keller

Family: Pinaceae

Synonyms: Forest pine, Scotch pine, Scots pine, Norway pine, pine needle

Aroma: Strong, fresh, resinous

Colour: Clear

Plant: Tall evergreen tree with reddish brown deeply fissured bark and a flat crown. The needles are 2.5 to 5cm long and 1-2mm broad, a glaucous blue-green turning darker green to dark yellow green in winter.

Main Growing Areas: Northern Europe, North America

Major Constituents: Borneol, borynl acetate, a- and β-pinene, limonene, delta-3-carene

Interesting snippets: Hippocrates recommended pine for pulmonary problems and throat infections.

The city of Venice in Italy has been sitting on a bed of pine since 810.

Pine trees typically live for 150 years but may live as long as 300 years.

In Japanese myths, ‘The Tree of Life’ is sometimes associated with the pine.

Spirit lovers are said to inhabit pine trees and live to a very old age.

In classical Kyogen theatre the image of a large pine tree always provides the stage backdrop.

pine cone and needlesPart of Plant used /Extraction: Fresh, young needles, pine cones, tips of the bough / steam distillation

Therapeutic actions: Pine eases colds, flu, coughs, laryngitis, bronchitis, catarrh and sinus congestion. Helpful for rheumatic, neuralgic and muscular aches and pains

Emotional and Spiritual: Feeling helpless and unworthy. Mental fatigue, promotes feelings of energy and well-being. Instils feelings of confidence, courage and clarity. Clear a healing or meditation space when feeling depleted on all levels, mentally, physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Robbi Zeck writes that pine validates and strengthens your own unique gifts and talents encouraging a simple knowing and belief of your self-worth.

Gabriel Mojay writes that pine is indicated where there is a weakness of ‘boundary’ and of self-identity – where one cannot distinguish others’ responsibilities from one’s own. Pine works to dissipate both a negative self-image and feelings of remorse, replacing undue guilt with forgiveness and self-acceptance.

Valerie Ann Worwood writes that pine teaches that it is love and generosity of spirit that endures – in the hearts of those we have loved and known and in our children.

Aromatherapy Insight Card:

Pine aromatherapy insight cardSELF WORTH
It is time to stop rescuing others and rescue yourself. Be strong but flexible, managing the knocks in life, living your own life and letting others live their own journey. Protect your boundaries; be true to you, treating yourself with honour and respect. Let go of negative experiences and move forward to a place where you feel fantastic about yourself. Remember you cannot rescue others; they need to do it for themselves. Allowing them to grow their way allows you to grow.

Fragrant Change Healing Card: I have the self-confidence to stand tall and allow the world to see the unique person I am.

Pine FCHC

Contemplations for the Soul Card:

Pine CFTS CardDo you feel worthless or not worthy of having all you wish for?
Do you put everyone’s wishes and wants before your own?
Why are you denying or hiding your unique gifts and talents?
Do you feel the need to take responsibility for other people’s mistakes?
Stop hiding! Stand tall and accept that your opinions matter and that you are good enough to reach your goals.
Value and have confidence in yourself and others will too.
Ignore everyone or thought that tells you you are not good enough to attain your dreams.
Don’t allow others to overstep your boundaries and stop feeling responsible for the mistakes or choices other people make.

Safety: Non-irritating, non-toxic, skin sensitising when oxidised. May be adulterated with turpentine oil or mixtures of pinene, camphene and bornyl acetate.

Sources: Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. The Perfect Potion, Australia (1995)
Davis, P, Aromatherapy An A-Z. The C.W.Daniel Company Ltd. (1996)
Hodges C, Fragrant change Healing Cards (2015)
Hodges C. Contemplations for the Soul (2016)
Jefferies J, Pine Essential Oil Profile. Aromatherapy Today, Vol.42 (2008)
Jefferies J, Osborn. K, Aromatherapy Insight Cards. Living Energy, Aust. (2nd Ed. 2005)
Keim Loughran J, Bull R, Aromatherapy Anointing Oils, Frog Books (2001)
Mojay G, Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit. Hodder and Stoughton (1996)
Tisserand R and Young R, Essential Oil Safety Second Edition, Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014 Pages 398 – 399
Worwood, V.A, The Fragrant Heavens. Doubleday Publishing UK (1999)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)

 

 

 

 

 

Davina (Artemisia pallens)

Davana header

Davana (Artemisia pallens) is an oil that is used extensively in Panch Karma clinics in India but is not well known in the West. In addition to its therapeutic uses davana is used in perfumery and as a flavouring in cakes, tobacco and alcoholic beverages.

Botanical Family: Asteraceae (Compositae).
Other oils in this family include the chamomiles, everlasting (Helichrysum italicum), inula (Inula graveolens) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium).

Aroma profile: rich, fruity, sweet and balsamic. The aroma is due to the presence of davanafurans.

Davana Essential OilEssential Oil: dark yellow to golden orange becoming viscous as it ages

Plant description: The plant which is indigenous to Mysore, India grows in the red soil that is characteristic of that part of India. It reaches a height of 2 feet (60 meters) has bluish green aromatic leaves with numerous small, yellow flowers along its stems.

Distillation: The plant is harvested in bright sunlight and air dried before steam distilling the flowers and leaves.

The oil yield on average after 6-8 hours of distillation is 0.2%

Chemical Constituents: According to Tisserand and Young (quoting Lawrence, 1995) the key constituents are (Z)-Davanone at 38%, Nerol at 10%, unidentified furans at 6%, (E)-Davanone at 5%, geraniol at 5%.

Farida Irani has davanone at 50% along with nordavanone, artemone and davana ether whose percentages she doesn’t state, while Tisserand and Young write that the davanone content can be as high as 55%.

The above differences show that it would be wise to check with your supplier to see how much davanone your oil actually contains.

Therapeutic properties and uses:
Antifungal
Antiparasitic – has been found effective against tapeworm and roundworm in vitro
Antiseptic
Aphrodisiac – has been used in the Middle East for millennia

Colds, flu and upper respiratory tract infections because of its antiviral, expectorant and mucolytic properties – use as an inhalation or chest rub.

Regulates and balances menstruation, helpful for dysmenorrhea because of its antispasmodic properties and for menopausal women.

Used in Indian clinics as a compress and douche for ovarian and uterine cysts.

Headache
Insect repellent
Nerve tonic
Helps soothe skin irritation and rashes.

Emotional:
Davana is a good anti-stress oil that can help with anxiety, nervous tension and insomnia.

The oil has antidepressant properties and is uplifting so could be useful in cases of depression.

Davana can help one deal with anger, disappointment and failure by working with the emotions and encouraging a sense of peace and a positive outlook.

Davana is useful for people dealing with shock and trauma.

Energetic:
Chakras: Davana works with the following chakras offering support, grounding and with its connection to the 6th chakra trust in your intuition.

1st – survival, safety and feeling supported
2nd – sexuality, passion and creativity
6th – connect with and develop trust in your intuition

Spiritual:
The flowers are dedicated to the Lord Shiva a Hindu God and are placed on his altar daily as a sign of love and devotion.

Davana can be used in your spiritual and devotional practices along with other oils like frankincense (Boswellia carterii) and palo santo (Bursera graveolens). One drop is usually sufficient as this oil has a strong aroma.

Suggested oil combinations:
Dysmenorrhea – davana, black pepper (Piper nigrum) and/or clary sage (Salvia sclarea)

Shock & trauma – davana and cistus (Cistus ladaniferus)

Colds and flu – davana, eucalyptus (Eucalyptus radiata) and/or tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) and/or ravensara (Ravensara aromatica)

Depression – davana, palo santo (Bursera graveolens) and/or lime (Citrus aurantifolia) or other citrus

Safety Issues:
Tisserand and Young write that the oil was tested at 4% on 25 volunteers and was neither irritating nor sensitising. They also write that no hazards or contraindications are known. Irani on the other hand suggests that one use caution in the first trimester but the oil is ideal for the last trimester of pregnancy and labour.

References:
Berkowsky B, Davana Synthesis Materia Medica/Spiritualis of Essential oils 1998 -2008
Irani F, Davana in Aromatherapy Today, Vol 51, August 2011
Irani F, The magic of Ayurveda Aromatherapy. Subtle Energies, Don Bosco Press, Mazagaon 2001 Page 105 & 106
Nakhare, S. Garg, S.C., Ancient Science of Life, Anthelmintic activity of the essential oil of Artemisia pallens Wall, Quintessential web base, 1991
Tisserand R and Young R, Essential Oil Safety Second Edition, Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014 Pages 267 – 268

This article was originally published in the April 2017 issue of AromaCulture Magazine (www.aromaculture.com) and has been adapted for use here with permission from the publisher.

Ravensara (Ravensara aromatica)

Ravensara

Ravensara is a good oil to have on hand during the winter months. She is one of the first oils I reach for when I’m coming down with a cold.

Family: Lauraceae

Synonyms: Madagascar spice, Madagascar nutmeg, clove nut.

Aroma: Fresh, sharp, clear, eucalyptus-like.

Colour: Colourless

RavensaraPlant: Tree 18 to 20 metres high with reddish grey bark and dark evergreen leaves.

Main Growing Areas: Madagascar, Reunion, Mauritius, Australia.

Major Constituents: Pinene, terpineol, linalool, eugenol, estragole.

Interesting snippets: The local people have used the bark, leaves and fruit since ancient times.
The name ravensara means the tree with good leaves in Malagasy.

Part of Plant used / Extraction: Leaves and twigs by very long, slow steam distillation.

Therapeutic actions: Antiviral and immunostimulant, excellent for colds and flu, sinusitis, bronchitis, whooping cough, cold sores, shingles, joint pains, muscular tension and  physical fatigue.

Emotional and Spiritual: Setting boundaries, mental fatigue.
Philippe Mailhebiau writes ravensara is for people who no longer enjoy life and doubt everything especially themselves, those who no longer know where they are through lack of aims or ideals and who, their morale affected, suffer various pains as a result.

Robbie Zeck writes Ravensara encourages the setting of personal boundaries. A boundary delineates what is included within as well as what is excluded. Learning to define your boundaries determines your identity and maintaining healthy boundaries is absolutely integral to your self-empowerment. Your emotional and physical wellbeing will be compromised if your boundaries are unstructured. Learn to say no: And remember, ‘no’ is a complete sentence.

Gabriel Mojay writes ravensara is ideal for restlessness and insomnia caused by nervous debility and illness. Like tea tree oil, it is also important in cases where anxiety and depression threaten to weaken the immune system.

Safety: Possible skin irritation, non-toxic.

Note: Ravensara (Ravensara aromatica) is often confused with Ravintsara (Cinnamomum camphora). They have a different chemical makeup with ravintsara having a large percentage of 1.8 cineole and ravensara very little. Ravintsara is considered gentler to use with children.

Sources: Davis P, Aromatherapy, An A-Z. The C.W.Daniel Company Ltd. (1996)
Mailhebiau P, Portraits in Oils. The C.W.Daniel Company Ltd. (1995)
Mojay G, Aromatherapy Class notes (1999)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)
https://materiaaromatica.com/default.aspx?go=article&articleID=187

Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia)

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Family: Myrtaceae

Synonyms: Ti-tree

Aroma: Fresh, spicy, medicinal.

Colour: Clear, colourless to pale yellow. Dark yellow indicates old or oxidized oil.

Teatree 5Plant: An evergreen tree that grows to 7 metres with paper like bark, small narrow leaves and profuse flowers.

Main Growing Areas: East coast of Australia.

Major Constituents: terpinene-4-ol, gamma-terpinene, alpha-terpineol, 1.8 cineole, para-cymene.

Interesting snippets: The first essential oil distillation was done in 1924.

The botanical name comes from the Greek melos meaning dark or black, and leukon meaning white. This was a reference to the white papery bark on the higher trunk and the black bark on the lower trunk.

From the 1790s onwards, the first European settlers who colonised the areas around the Clarence and Richmond Rivers learned from the Bundjalong tribe how to use the leaves for healing purposes, such as inhalations for respiratory ailments, and poultices, infusions and ointments for infected wounds.

Part of Plant used / Extraction: Leaves and twigs by steam distillation. Yield varies from 1.8 to 3.5%. The oil oxidises over time.

Therapeutic actions: Infected skin rashes, acne, boils, colds, flu, tinea, candida, sore throat.

Emotional and Spiritual: Nervous debility, mental fatigue and chronic lethargy.
Robbi Zeck writes that tea tree will take you beyond any points of difference, raise your tolerance level and encourage you to see the bigger picture. It builds confidence and a strong sense of integrity that also helps to develop robust immunity and inner containment.

Gabriel Mojay writes that tea tree oil is of special importance to physically delicate individuals who struggle not only with their bodies, but with the feelings of victimisation and doom that can easily accompany and exacerbate chronic ill-health.

Aromatherapy Insight Card:

Tea Tree insight card

UNDERSTANDING
Replace your “victim” mentality and feelings of doom and gloom with a feeling of understanding. Take a step back; release the struggle in life by understanding why events happen. By finding patience and seeing other points of view, you bring tolerance and growth into your environment and life. Enjoy the chance to learn to understand yourself and the others in your life.

Fragrant Change Healing card: There is always another point of view.

Tea tree Fragrant Change healing card

Contemplations for the Soul:

Tea tree FCHC

Are you dealing with a challenging situation, problem or person?
Are you trying to find an answer but it keeps eluding you?
Do you lack confidence and think of yourself as a victim in this situation?
Are you feeling confused and emotionally shattered?
Try looking at it from a new perspective.
Take a wider view and look at the bigger picture rather focussing on a small part of it.
Change your attitude from one of victim to one of a confident, focussed individual who has the ability to remain strong no matter what kind of toxic or challenging circumstances they find themselves in.
Remember you have the strength and insight to deal with this challenge or person.

Safety: Non-irritating, non-sensitising, non-toxic.

Sources: Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. The Perfect Potion, Australia (1995)
Bowles E.J, The A to Z of Essential Oils. New Burlington Books (2003)
Hodges C. Contemplations for the Soul (2016)
Hodges C, Fragrant Change Healing Cards (2015)
Kerr J, Tea Tree Essential Oil Profile. Aromatherapy Today, Vol.13 (2000)
Jefferies J, Osborn K, Aromatherapy Insight Cards. Living Energy, Aust. (2nd Ed. 2005)
Mojay G, Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit. Hodder and Stoughton (1996)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)

 

Essential Oils For Winter

Essential Oils for Winter

Winter has arrived and although the days are relatively warm and sunny there will be days when it seems spring will never come. You will be exposed to people with coughs and colds on the bus, train, in shops and at work or perhaps in your own family. During this time I use essential oils to help lessen the chances of me catching a cold and if I should catch one to get over it very quickly.

The oils below can be used for many of the minor and not so minor inconveniences of winter.
Black Pepper(Piper nigrum)
Black pepper A very warming oil ideal for massaging sore, tight muscles and warming cold hands and feet. On a spiritual level she is about taking responsibility for your own actions and loosening blockages that maybe holding you back from following your path in life. Use 2-6 drops in a bath or footbath to warm cold feet and get your circulation moving.

Ginger(Zingiber officinale)
Sliced Ginger Root 1Ginger is another very warming oil but she also helps you to get going if you have been procrastinating as well as rebuilding your stamina and energy after illness. The Chinese believe that drinking hot ginger tea at the first sign of a cold prevents you from getting one.

Ravensara(Ravensara aromatica)
ravensaraRavensara is a very powerful antiviral oil that I put in my clients blend when they have a cold. She helps them fight the cold and protects me from getting their cold. On a spiritual, emotional level she helps you set boundaries. In the case of a cold or flu your boundaries are set as most people will keep their distance for fear of catching your cold. Ravensara is also very good for cold sores. Use a cotton bud to apply to the cold sore 4 or 5 times a day.

Eucalyptus(Eucalyptus radiata or Smithii)
eucalyptus-treesEucalyptus Smithii is considered gentler to use with young children. Put 2 drops in some bubble bath or full cream milk and add to a warm or tepid bath to help bring down a fever. Make a blend of eucalyptus, teatree and ravensara to help ease the symptoms of cold and flu. Add black pepper or rosemary if their neck, shoulders or chest is tight from coughing. You can use a combination of any of the above. Add 15 drops to 20mls of vegetable oil and rub into neck, back and chest 3 or 4 times a day. Use eucalyptus in a vaporiser to help kill bacteria in the air and in steam inhalations to ease a tight chest.

Tea Tree(Melaleuca alternifolia)
Teatree 5Although it tastes terrible you may want to try gargling with teatree to help ease a sore throat. You may even be able to avoid the symptoms of cold or flu if you gargle at the first sign of a sore or ticklish throat. Add 2 drops of teatree essential oil to a cup or glass of water. Gargle, spit out and don’t swallow. Use with eucalyptus in a vaporiser to help kill any bacteria in the atmosphere.

Rosemary(Rosmarinus officinalis)
Rosemary flowers and leavesRosemary is excellent for sore, tight muscles and works well in a chest blend. Along with eucalyptus she can help open congested nasal passages. Try placing 1 or 2 drops on a tissue or if you are in public you can put a few cotton balls in a small bottle such as an empty essential oil bottle, add 3 or 4 drops of rosemary, eucalyptus, ravensara, teatree or any combination of these and close the lid. Open the bottle and sniff whenever your nose is feeling blocked. You could also take deep breaths from your tissue or bottle whenever someone with a cold has coughed on or near you to lessen your chances of catching a cold. Another alternative is to use a personal inhaler.

Sweet Orange(Citrus sinensis)
Orange treeSweet orange is perfect for those dark dull days of winter when you think the sun will never shine again. She helps lift the spirits of those sick with cold and flu. Use in the vaporiser to bring some cheer or combine with eucalyptus or teatree to lighten the aroma.
You could also use lemon or mandarin for this purpose.

Finally remember to rest in bed for a few days to help you get over your cold or flu quickly. To prevent getting a cold in the first place keep active, eat nourishing, warming food, use your essential oils and take time out for yourself.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

rosemary header

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you, love remember.
And there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.
William Shakespeare

Family: Lamiaceae

Synonyms: R. coronarium

Aroma: Penetrating, refreshing, herbaceous.

Colour: Clear to pale yellow.

Rosemary flowers and leavesPlant: An evergreen shrub that grows up to 2 metres high with silvery grey needle shaped leaves and pale blue flowers. As the plant ages the leaves lose part of their oil and the plant becomes progressively odourless.

Main Growing Areas: Tunisia, Spain, Morocco, France.

Major Constituents: There are 3 chemotypes, 1,8 cineole, camphor and verbenone. The amount of each constituent varies with the chemotype but all include 1.8 cineole, alpha-pinene, camphor, alpha-pinene, borneol, borynl acetate.

Interesting snippets: Rosemary essential oil was first distilled in the 13th century.
The Ancient Egyptians used Rosemary as a ritual incense in the tombs of the Pharaohs to assist them to recall their former life.

The Greeks and Romans regarded Rosemary as sacred, a symbol of remembrance, loyalty, and scholarly learning. Throughout the ages, Rosemary garlands and headdresses were worn at all important occasions as a symbol of trust.

The herb was used in former times to delay the putrefaction in uncooked meat.

The French used it as a disinfectant in hospital wards during epidemics.

Part of Plant used / Extraction: Leaves and flowering tops by steam distillation. A complete distillation takes around one and a half hours.

Therapeutic actions: Colds and flu, catarrh, sinusitis, muscular aches and pains, arthritis, rheumatism.

Emotional and Spiritual: Clears and refreshes a tired mind and improves concentration. Helps clear mental confusion in the elderly. Can renew enthusiasm and improve self-confidence.

Robbi Zeck writes that when familiar patterns, conditions, habits and beliefs keep resurfacing and manifesting in your life, rosemary moves you onward freeing you from restriction, sluggishness and mental fatigue.

Gabriel Mojay writes that as a Herb of Remembrance, it helps us not only to recall loved ones, but to remember our own true path.

Aromatherapy Insight Card:
CREATIVITY
Rosemary gladdens the spirit, invoking confidence to command creative energy into action. Believe in yourself, you can manifest anything if you believe in it. Explore your creative side and free yourself from life’s restrictions. Rosemary allows you to explore outside your everyday world. Find your own personal expression of creativity and paint your life the colours that you want.

RosemaryCourtesy of J. Jefferies & K. Osborn.

Fragrant Change Healing Card: I am a creative person who finds creative solutions to my problems

rosemary Fragrant Change Healing card

Contemplations for the Soul:

Rosemary CFTS card

Have you forgotten your creativity or even that you are a creative being?
Are you feeling mentally fatigued and apathetic?
Have you forgotten who you truly are and what you can accomplish?
Have you forgotten your path and purpose in life?
We think of rosemary for remembrance but she is also a creative force.
Stop today and think of all the ways you are creative in your life.
People may comment on your creativity in a certain area but you may not see it because it seems so natural to you.
Slow down and remember the creative person you are and acknowledge your worth.

Safety: Non-irritating, non-sensitising, non-toxic

Sources: Battaglia S, The Complete Guide To Aromatherapy. The Perfect Potion, Australia (1995)
Bowles E.J, The A to Z of Essential Oils. New Burlington Books (2003)
Hodges C, Contemplations for the Soul (2016)
Hodges C, Fragrant Change Healing Cards (2015)
Jefferies J, Osborn K, Aromatherapy Insight Cards. Living Energy, Aust. (2nd Ed. 2005)
Kerr J, Rosemary Essential Oil Profile. Aromatherapy Today, Vol.24 (2002)
Mojay G, Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit. Hodder and Stoughton (1996)
Zeck R, The Blossoming Heart. Aroma Tours (2004)